How This Actress Saves 10% of Her Variable Income

How This Actress Saves 10% of Her Variable Income

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Actress saves 10%

In 2009 I taught English conversation in Algeria earning $3/hour.

I hadn’t made that little since I babysat my cousin in 1992. This was my day job. I led conversation classes while my husband and I created a theater company that offered workshops and solo performances.

We were always paid in cash.

When we got married my husband had no savings. I had $2500. I also still owed $14,000 in student loans. Mohammed had always lived in his family home in Oran, Algeria. I had been living on my own for 4 years in Minneapolis. I hadn’t really figured out a good savings strategy.

I had opened up a ROTH IRA but no one told me I needed to contribute to it monthly. I thought somehow my $1000 would magically turn into $1,000,000 by the time I was 65 on its own.

OPENING A BANK ACCOUNT IN ALGERIA WAS TRICKY.

Apparently it’s not for everyone. You have to have proof of income and they interview you. Luckily, I had a contract from an early education center where I was to offer three weeks of drama in the classroom workshops for preschool teachers. Every time we were paid we had to take the cash to the bank.

Once, my husband was paid about $500 with a cheque. He had to take it to the bank where the cheque was issued. They didn’t have enough cash on hand so he had to wait two hours until someone came in and made a cash deposit.

Our income came in fits and starts. Sometimes we’d travel around the country. Sometimes we’d work nearby. We didn’t pay money for rent—we lived with my mother-in-law, so I would say we paid rent in dish-washing.

Over the course of a month our income might have looked like this:

  • $60 (a week of teaching English conversation)
  • $300 (a performance for a cultural center)
  • $50 (a commercial for the national electric company)

In my mind I had one thing I was constantly focused on: how do I not get stuck here?

How do I have enough money to travel and take a break from the in-laws? How can I save enough so we can move to the US in two years?

I used to listen to podcasts while I cleaned, did all those dishes and took bus after bus after train around Algeria. The one I liked the best was Marketplace Money. At the time, Tess Vigeland hosted it and she often had David Lazarus answering listeners’ questions. I heard Tess interviewed by Joel Saul-Sehy a few years after she quit, saying that she had gotten tired of answering the same questions every show. But the weekly repetition of the same answers to the same questions was exactly what I needed. Over and over again I heard them say:

Save at least 10% of every paycheck.

Actress saves 10%

This is what getting paid with a bag of cash looks like

THAT BECAME MY MISSION, MY LASER FOCUS, AND MY RAISON D’ÊTRE. TEN PERCENT.

My husband would bring home a bag of cash (I’m not kidding. Sometimes it was a plastic bag of cash wrapped in newspaper) and I would take 10% off the top and put it in my special leather billfold.

Even if it was $20. $2 came off the top and into the billfold.

It didn’t matter.

10% of everything. It became a ritual.

Get paid, come home, hand me the cash and take 10%. When my billfold was hard to zip I took it to the bank. Sometimes even sooner because I worried about being tempted to touch it.

Once, I deposited $5 in the bank. It wasn’t next door either. I had to take a bus from the suburb we lived in to a stop at the edge of Oran called “Les Amandiers.” Then I could take a taxi or a bus and get off three blocks from the bank. This took about 40 minutes if everything was running smoothly.

40 minutes on public transportation to deposit $5 into our savings account.

In 2009 we collectively earned $6000. In 2010 we earned $8000. In 2012 when we did Mohammed’s visa paperwork and bought two Algeria-Minneapolis plane tickets we had saved $3000.

IN 2012, NOW IN MINNEAPOLIS, THE 10% HABIT SUDDENLY WAS GONE.

Our routine was so different. We paid rent in dollars and not in dish-washing. We had some regular income and some random freelance income. Without the framework and the clear laser focused goal of moving to America pushing me along, I floundered. Until one day I looked at our bank account.

Almost year after living in Minnesota I panicked, “Mohammed we don’t have anything extra. What happened? This makes me so anxious. Where is all our money going?”

And he said, “remember when we used to take 10% of everything. That worked really well.”

I no longer had Tess Vigeland and David Lazarus in my ear every week driving the point home. But we started it again. We opened an online savings account with a higher interest rate.

10%. Without a goal it’s harder. So I made some goals and posted them on the fridge.

  • $15,000 emergency savings.
  • $10,000 to have a baby.
  • $30,000 to buy a house.

In 2016 we made close to $50,000 between theater work in Minneapolis and TV work in Algeria.  We’re on our way again.

It’s harder somehow with bigger numbers.

I have to construct the same urgency that I felt when I knew I didn’t want to live the rest of my life with in-laws. I had to reform the habit. But now it’s back.

I brush my teeth, I take out the trash, I meditate 10 minutes, and I save 10%. No matter how small the paycheck. $60 for writing this blog post? $6 into savings.

Except this time without a 40-minute bus ride.

Taous Claire Khazem

Taous Claire Khazem

Paid Contributor

Taous Claire Khazem is an actress, teaching artist and director based in Minneapolis, MN, USA. She also appears on the Algerian sit-com Sultan Achour 10. She is a recipient of the Fox Foundation Resident Actor Fellowships.

For more information check out HER WEBSITE.

Want to start getting control of your money? How can I help?

How to save money at Christmas

How to save money at Christmas

If I had a nickel for every time I hear or see the word ‘savings’ around Christmas time…. I would have a lot of nickels.

But … riddle me this…

If there are so many ‘savings’ to be had, why do I always end up spending way more than I can afford at Christmas?

CHECKMATE, CHRISTMAS SAVINGS PROMISES!!!!

That’s what I was thinking about this week as I managed to get most of my shopping done more than a week before Christmas (which is a week ahead of normal).

And suddenly I stumbled on a thought…

Retailers at Christmas keep using this word… savings…

… but it doesn’t mean what we think it means.

Money Christmas

Savings are based on expectation.

If you spend more than you planned… you didn’t save.

So, here’s how you should save money this Christmas (you should do it… because I already failed at doing it).

How to save money at Christmas time:

 

Set realistic expectations

These come from two sides:

  1. How much money can I afford to spend?
  2. How much money am I going to spend anyways, no matter what I can afford?

When you combine these two numbers you get something resembling the truth.

Of course you want to buy nice things that your friends and loved ones will enjoy… but you also don’t want to hate your life in January and February.

So, really look at your numbers and decide how much you can afford to spend.

You can either do a big total Christmas number OR you can break it down per individual gift.

Don’t get sucked in by the promise of ‘savings’

Now, you have to ignore every ‘deal’ you see UNLESS it applies to the plan you’ve set up.

Savings only exist in the context of your plan, all other savings are lies that are trying to trick you out of your money.

RESIST!

Bask in the glory of true savings

When you set realistic expectations, it sets up a framework for you to kick ass.

It’s actually really possible to shave off $5 here, and $10 there.

It might not match up to the promise of hundreds of dollars off the original price on that thing that still costs a thousand dollars.

But at least they’re real.

And that’s the true magic of Christmas savings.

Want to start getting control of your money? How can I help?

Chris Enns

Chris Enns

Financial Planner/Opera Singer

Money never came naturally to me. In fact… I was a bit of a disaster. I remember (very clearly) what it feels like to be ‘financially out of control’.

And honestly, I still get stressed about money… that doesn’t stop… the difference is that now I have the tools to deal with that stress.

And those tools are what’s made it possible for me to build a life full of the things I want: art, creativity, travel, family and more.

If you want to start getting control of your money I’d love to help. You can start with THIS QUIZ, visiting my GETTING STARTED PAGE or by checking out my SERVICES page.

Don’t let audition season destroy your bank account

Don’t let audition season destroy your bank account

This post originally appeared on Schmopera: an excellent site for all things opera.

Auditioning is so freaking expensive.

This is a fact. And it feels like it’s getting worse.

After application fees, travel, accommodation, food, accompanist fees, and the 3 beers you need after they decided to only hear one aria even though you were banking on them asking for the Bellini…

…you’re probably not sitting on a whole lot of leftover cash.

But you have to do it, right? How are you supposed to get work if you don’t show up?

That’s right. You do have to audition. You do have to pay all the fees, whether you think they’re ethical or not.

But you don’t have to let it destroy your bank account.

AUDITION SEASON HAPPENS EVERY YEAR:

Every year. It’s like Christmas or Flag day. So why not save ahead?

People are always complaining about how it’s impossible to budget in this business. The income is too variable! The costs are too variable!! Well, there are SOLUTIONS FOR THE VARIABLE INCOME, and I’d like to challenge the idea of variable costs as well.

A tree falling on your car is an unexpected cost. Audition season is a totally 100% expected cost, one that you can completely plan for.

No, you don’t ever know exactly how much it’s going to cost every year, but you can make a pretty good guess. If you’ve been through it before, take a look at what it cost you last year. If it’s your first time… think it through. A few trips to New York or Toronto: where are you going to stay? How much does that cost? What do accompanists charge? How many applications are you putting in?

You can get exact about the number, or you can just pick a number out of thin air.

I’m going to save 2000 dollars for audition season.

Wait…what? Where am I supposed to get 2000 dollars…? That’s insane.

LIFE LESSON: BIG NUMBERS ARE MADE OF SMALL NUMBERS

The thing about these big one-time costs.. Christmas, car insurance, or audition season.. is that they seem like too much to set aside out of any given month’s income.

When you’re pulling in just enough to make it through, it’s impossible to set aside two grand in one month. So why not break it up into chunks?

What if last January you had taken a look at the year in front of you, and thought… “man… I want to make a big push next audition season. Last year it cost me around 2000 dollars, so if I just sock away 200 bucks a month, I’ll be ready to roll come November.”

200 bucks a month 47 bucks a week 6.78 a day

And hey presto, come audition season you’re ready to roll!

BUT I DON’T HAVE 200 BUCKS A MONTH TO SPEND ON… SAVINGS…

When I talk about savings, it sounds like I’m outlining a luxury: something to do with all your ‘extra’ money. So if you don’t have any ‘extra’ money, saving seems impossible.

But I’m not talking about how you can spend your ‘extra’ money. I’m talking about how you’re going to find the money to afford to support what you’re already spending.

You’re going to audition. We talked about it in the first paragraph. You have to.

So if you don’t put aside the money, where’s it going to come from?

Planning for major once a year expenses, like Christmas, birthdays, or… audition season, isn’t about adding another cost to every month. It’s acknowledging the fact that you’re already spending the money, and breaking up the cost over more time to make it easier to collect it.

 

 

IT’S NOT ROCKET SCIENCE, IT’S CALLED A PLAN

You can choose to be blindsided by the same stuff every year.

“How did I spend that much on Christmas???” “Plane tickets cost HOW MUCH???”

Or you can stop budgeting bullshit. It’s fine that you spend money at Christmas. Christmas is great!! And if you put away 25 bucks a month all year, you can do all that spending, without the guilt. I’ve been doing it for the last few years, and I love Christmas now… it’s all the fun, with none of the pain.

Audition season is such a stressful time. There’s so much that you can’t control. There’s so much that is really hard. Why not try to take the pressure off of yourself?

Look ahead. Make a little sketch of the costs, and starting this January put away a little cash every month to make next year’s auditions just a little less awful.

Want to start getting control of your money? How can I help?

Chris Enns

Chris Enns

Financial Planner/Opera Singer

Money never came naturally to me. In fact… I was a bit of a disaster. I remember (very clearly) what it feels like to be ‘financially out of control’.

And honestly, I still get stressed about money… that doesn’t stop… the difference is that now I have the tools to deal with that stress.

And those tools are what’s made it possible for me to build a life full of the things I want: art, creativity, travel, family and more.

If you want to start getting control of your money I’d love to help. You can start with THIS QUIZ, visiting my GETTING STARTED PAGE by checking out my SERVICES page.

What I learned about money from eating a thousand peaches

What I learned about money from eating a thousand peaches

Who it’s for: Everyone (but especially peach lovers)
What it’s about: Saving is about prolonging enjoyment of something you love, and sometimes things that look like money…. aren’t money. 
What you get: TWO FREE WORKSHEETS – one to help you start saving, and one to get you saving better than you already are.

I love peach season.

And this year has been a pleasure pandemonium (#fancywords).

The last few weeks I’ve been gorging myself on fresh peaches at nearly every meal.

And because my mind has no ability to structure itself, my peach fanaticism and my constant money thoughts have melded into two peach-related money metaphors I thought I’d share with y’all.

I hope you enjoy both of them, and the end of peach season. (more…)

RRSP’s 101: How RRSP’s work and whether it’s the right tool for you?

RRSP’s 101: How RRSP’s work and whether it’s the right tool for you?

RRSP Basics - From Rags to Reasonable

If you’ve been in Canada over the last month you’ve probably seen a ton of ads and ‘reminders’ (they’re also ads) to put money into your RRSP.

DO IT! PUT MONEY IN IT!

DID YOU KNOW THAT MOST PEOPLE DON’T?? DON’T BE MOST PEOPLE! JUST PUT THE MONEY IN.

Ughhhhhhh.

That’s because we’ve just come to the end of what wonderful finance nerds the country over call ‘RRSP season’. It’s the time of year when lots of people are making contributions, topping up accounts, and looking to get their tax efficiencies in order.

But most of us… we’re just trying to get through another Canadian winter.

Actually, I think a lot of us just don’t really understand what an RRSP is… yet.

I sure didn’t.

I thought I did… but if I’d been asked to explain it… it would have probably sounded like this…

“Oh ya, an RRSP… um.. You just get one, and it’s for retirement… and you should really have one… but I don’t have one… I guess I should do that.”

I mean… why would you even need to read the rest of this post?? I think that definition is pretty clear.

But in case it’s not, today we’re going to break it down, and I mean really break it down. We’re going to talk about what an RRSP actually is, how it works, and whether it’s the right tool for YOU and your life.

Because let’s be honest… RRSP’s are great, they’re an amazing and pretty powerful tool for long term savings, but after I learned how they worked… I stopped contributing to mine.

It wasn’t the best tool for me, and it might not be the best tool for you either! (more…)

Exchange Rate 101: How to save money on a terrible Canadian dollar

Exchange Rate 101: How to save money on a terrible Canadian dollar

A few weeks ago I bought several pairs of socks. 

I needed socks. I’ve needed socks for quite some time. And so I thought I would capitalize on a a great sale. High quality, fun coloured socks for a mere $3.23. 

Cha. Ching. 

Except that’s not how the story ended. 

Those socks ended up costing me almost 5 dollars a pair. 

How?

Because of this: 

1 Canadian dollar = 70 cents American (and it’s now… probably even worse by the time you read this)

The best advice for saving money on a bad Canadian dollar (and why it may not work for freelancers)

I bought those socks when I was in New York visiting my girlfriend. She’s a freelancer who does about half of her work in the states. 

When I got back, I was a man on a mission… there must be some way to save when the dollar is this bad. There are so many smart finance people in Canada, surely one of them would have an amazing tip for me. 

The best tip came from Rob Engen, blogger and financial advisor at Boomer and Echo:

Stay home”

……

Can’t really argue with that. And honestly, if you’re not a freelancer, or someone that HAS TO travel to the states for work, or relationships, or some other unavoidable reason… you can just stop reading this right now, because that’s really solid advice. 

But for a lot of us, ‘staying home’ isn’t an option. So how do we weather the storm that is a terrible Canadian dollar? How do we keep our already thin profit margins intact over the next few years (because most people agree that this is not going to get better anytime soon)? 

So this week I’m going to put out a couple of posts about managing the US/Canadian exchange rate.  Sorry to my wonderful non-Canadian readers, but don’t be distraught. To you I offer this advice: come to Canada on vacation and live like kings.  

For the rest of you, over the next few days here’s what we’ll be looking at: 

Part 1: Exchange rate 101

The first thing that you need to know about the business of exchange rates is that people make a butt ton of money changing money between
currencies. 

You don’t need to understand all the ways they do it, but you do need to know that the average person (like me) isn’t ‘making’ money off of exchange rates… we’re paying. Exchange Rate 101 - From Rags to Reasonable

You also need to know that the rate you see plastered all over the TV and the yahoo homepage is NOT the rate that anyone will actually pay you either to get US dollars, or to trade them back in for Canadian ones. 

If 1 Canadian dollar = 71 cents American you can bet your buttons that those 71 cents are going to cost you a bit more than that. And if you’re trying to change American money into Canadian… you can bet those same buttons that they’re not going to pay you as much as they should. 

Rule one of currency exchange: there is always a fee. 

The thing that you need to decide for yourself is: do you care?

The personal finance community likes to talk about fees like they’re the worst thing in the world. But fees are sometimes completely worth it for the convenience of a service. 

Like anything in the world, there are always ways to ‘save money’, but you decide if it’s worth the hassle. Do you want to be the guy who barters with the teller at Walmart? You may think you don’t… but that guy just got 2 BBQs for the price of one… 

The point isn’t to avoid fees at all cost, it’s to understand them and then make an informed decision. 

Where does that fee come from? 

So how do the banks make money? I called them to ask a few questions and it went a bit like this: 

  • Bank: *insert polite greeting*
  • Me: *responded politely. Mentioned the weather. Blah blah blah. Canadian comments*
  • Bank: What can I help you with? 
  • Me: I had some questions about exchange rates… mainly about the fees that you charge on exchanging money. 
  • Bank: We actually don’t charge fees. 
  • Me: What?
  • Bank: No fees. We set a daily rate and that’s what we pay. 
  • Me: Okay… and does that daily rate include some kind of … fee?
  • Bank: I’m just given the daily rate.
  • Me: Okay… but there must be a fee. You’re a bank. It’s okay… I’m not mad, I just want to know what I’m paying for. You know, so I can be an informed customer. 
  • Bank: NO FEEEEEEEEEEE!!!!!!!!

*The following was a dramatization of a conversation that happened a while ago… the details are clearly not exact, but the subject matter is spot on. We talked for a while and the bank weirdly refused to use the word ‘fee’ or tell me how they made money on cash currency exchanges.

Exchange Rate 101 - From Rags to Reasonable
 
I called again this week (the same bank). 

  • Bank: *insert polite greeting*
  • Me: *responded politely. Mentioned the weather. Blah blah blah. Canadian comments*
  • Bank: What can I help you with? 
  • Me: I had some questions about exchange rates… mainly about the fees that you charge on exchanging money. 
  • Bank: We charge a 2.5% conversion rate on top of whatever the exchange rate is. 
  • Me: … 
  • Bank: Does that help?
  • Me: Yes…yes it does…

He then gave me a bunch of comparable rates, told me to be careful because they change every 3 minutes and we parted ways. Score one for customer service.

Fact: People hate fees. That’s why the bank doesn’t really like to talk about them. Instead what they do is take the ‘real’ exchange rate (the one that you hear about on the news), add their fee and make a new rate that they offer to people. So you don’t see: exchange rate + fee. You just see: increased exchange rate. 

With credit cards it’s a little more cut and dry. They’re fairly straight forward about their fee. When I called my credit cards it was also a 2.5 foreign transaction fee that they applied on top of whatever exchange rate they were charging (although he became very confused when I asked him how they set their exchange rate… I guess you can’t have it all). 

I’d like to pause for a moment to say: this is not a definitive post/list on foreign fees. I have not called all financial institutions, or credit cards. I talked to the banks that I work with, and checked out a few others online. It’s meant as a place to start. If you’re curious about your exact rates: call your bank/credit card and ask (but here’s a hint: if they say they don’t charge fees… they’re not really telling you the truth). 

Okay… back to the banks and their fees. I don’t know… banks charge fees. Banks make money. So do credit cards. They’re also a super convenient way to get cash, and spend cash. The question is still, does it bother you? And if it does… how can you save some money??

Exchange Rate 101 - From Rags to Reasonable

Part 2: Saving money on da fees!!

There will always be fees. But if they really bother you, there are ways you can save a bit of money. 

  1. Get the best rate
  2. Unavoidable fees VS avoidable fees
  3. Using the right credit card
  4. Setting up a float

Like always, it’s up to you to decide whether it’s worth the time and the effort to save a few bucks. But for those of you who travel and work in the states a lot… it might be worth it to investigate. 

Getting the best rate: 

It’s basic advice, but different banks and organizations have different rates. I spent 10 minutes hopping to a few banks and places that deliver cash to your door and definitely found some differences: 

  • Travelex – buying 1000 US dollars = cost 1515.38 CAD
  • TD Online – buying 1000 US dollars = cost 1464.40 CAD
  • RBC Online – buying 1000 US dollars = cost 1472.20 CAD

These rates change all the time (and these prices don’t include delivery fees, they’re just the original quoted prices), but it might be worth it to look around for a few minutes before grabbing some cash. 

I think it’s interesting to note that a few travel sites talked about the advantage of changing cash in the destination country instead of in Canada (they weren’t writing specifically about the US) so I thought I’d try a US bank. 

  • Bank of America – buying 1000 US dollars – cost 1520.22 CAD

*These are not definitive or foolproof experiments… just information. Do your own research. 

Unavoidable fees VS avoidable fees:

It seems to me there’s a basic rule of money: 

If you think ahead you can save money. People love to profit on your forgetfulness. 

Exchange Rate 101 - From Rags to Reasonable

You can’t avoid a bank fee (at least not completely), what you can do is avoid paying the higher fees that you’ll find in the airport at those little currency booths. 

This article from investopedia simplifies it nicely: 

  • Worst rates: the airport
  • Bad rates: those currency exchange stores you see in touristy areas
  • Good rates (or at least you best options): ATMs and local banks. 

I will throw out a word of caution about ATMs. They can really hose you with fees. They’re all different, so it’s tough to break down, but it’s good to understand. Sometimes you can end up getting charged by multiple banks and service providers… which is not super fun. 

I bank with TD, and it’s really nice when I go to the states (especially New York) because they have American branches everywhere. The American TD and the Canadian TD are NOT the same bank, BUT I can use their ATMs without a fee. Which is really nice. 

Using the right credit card:

I have a great travel card. I collect points. It’s got good travel insurance, and some other tasty travel perks. 

It also has a nice little 2.5% foreign transaction fee. This is something I kind of knew… but hadn’t given much thought until the dollar got absolutely terrible and I started writing this article. 

If you travel a lot, you might be interested in getting a NO FOREIGN TRANSACTION FEE credit card, of which there are shockingly few. 

Personal finance blogger and travel guru Barry Choi breaks them down HERE

  •  Amazon Rewards Visa Card
  • Marriott Premier Rewards Visa
  • Rogers Platinum Mastercard

It’s interesting to me that there are so few credit cards with no foreign fees, so let me know if you know of some that aren’t on this list. 

The only one of the three without an annual fee is the Amazon card, and they all have different perks which may or may not sound tasty to you. 

Just remember, you might be hooked on your card that gives you 2% cash back, or a couple of travel points per dollar spent, but if you’ve got a foreign transaction fee you could be losing all of that when you travel anyways. 

$2 cash back MINUS 2.5% transaction fee = you’re losing money… not gaining it. #thinkaboutit

Setting up a US dollar float:

This might be my favourite method, and it’s especially useful for people who work in the states quite a bit. 

Don’t spend your Canadian money in the states. Keep US dollars available for when you go down. 

Exchange Rate 101 - From Rags to Reasonable

If you believe some of the crazy doomsday predictions for the Canadian dollar in 2016, things are not going to go well. They’re talking about it dipping to a value lower than 60 cents to the US dollar. 

So why not set yourself up now, to avoid that pain? 

Most banks have US dollar accounts that you can open. They allow you to keep some of your money in US dollars. That means that if you changed a few hundred bucks over now, and the dollar goes down another 10 cents… it matters less. On your next trip to the states, you’re spending US dollars. 

This works especially well for people who are working in the US and getting paid in US dollars. It’s really tempting right now to bring all your money back to Canada and take advantage of the sweet side of this crazy dollar… but it might be a good idea to keep some of it in the states. 

The idea of setting a ‘float’ is having an account with US money in it that you can use instead of being a slave to the variable dollar. 

When you’re a freelancer, any way that you can cut out some variability is sanity in your pocket. 

*It’s important to note that exchange rates are really variable and impossible to predict. No matter what the ‘experts’ say today, it may change tomorrow. A float can be a useful tool, but there is always risk when you’re transferring between currencies. You CAN lose money. 

Are you an american living in canada?

Listen to cross-border finance expert Julia Chung talk about the complications of existing on both sides of the border. 

Part 3: Is it worth it? 

I don’t know. 

You can definitely save some money shopping the market, thinking ahead, getting the right credit card and setting up a float. It takes time, though… and maybe for the small amount of money that you change over it doesn’t matter. 

But if you’re in, and want to squeeze the value out of every dollar made, then take a look at some of these tools and start saving. 

 I know that I’m going to look into getting a no foreign transaction fee credit card in the new year, as well as looking at setting up a US dollar float. 

What do you think? Is it worth the energy for you to save a few bucks? How do you save on the bad dollar or does it even matter to you? Share your wisdom (or just your frustration in the comments!!).


Don’t miss PART 2! When we talk about two ways to save hundreds in fees when you’re bringing larger sums across the border!

Want to start getting control of your money? How can I help?

Chris Enns

Chris Enns

Financial Planner/Opera Singer

Money never came naturally to me. In fact… I was a bit of a disaster. I remember (very clearly) what it feels like to be ‘financially out of control’.

And honestly, I still get stressed about money… that doesn’t stop… the difference is that now I have the tools to deal with that stress.

And those tools are what’s made it possible for me to build a life full of the things I want: art, creativity, travel, family and more.

If you want to start getting control of your money I’d love to help. You can start with THIS QUIZ, visiting my GETTING STARTED PAGE or by checking out my SERVICES page.

EMAIL ME